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Monday, August 2, 2010

Marketing through social media...

I subscribe to the Marketing Christian Books blog and I really liked today's article. It could seem to some that the ideas contained in it should go without saying, but they don't. I've met many writing friends who do not understand the importance of having a social media presence and who perhaps see it as an excuse to waste time online. As a result, they limit their influence. Like it or not, social media has made the world a smaller place and by not "getting out there" you make your sphere of influence even smaller by comparison. It is the norm these days to have a several hundred (or thousand!) "friends" on facebook, twitter, and other sites. Having 50-100 "real life" friends who know about your work is no longer all that impressive a number. You simply MUST reach out further and use the tools of our techno-age.

This article offers a great crash course in how to do that properly. You must not simply start spamming your online communities with information about your writing project. Do it RIGHT and you'll be building an audience and a circle of friends. You'd be surprised how close an online friendship can become (and no, I'm not talking about dating sites!) Relationships formed online are not just random and meaningless. Not if you invest in them like you would any other face-to-face relationship.

So, I decided this warranted a blog posting here and a link to the article, entitled Are You Talking or Shouting? , at Marketing Christian Books. (This is a great blog to follow if you need to learn about marketing. I definitely recommend it. )

What do you think?

6 comments:

Phoenix said...

Social media marketing is SUCH a hot topic right now. Not for the under-25 crowd who just do it the Nike way, but for the rest of us trying to catch up and play and do it right. It's definitely a whole new skill set and mind set trying to capture that elusive balance between being a wallflower and being totally obnoxious. Which may not be all that different from learning how to act at a party -- some people get it and some people never do.

Terri Tiffany said...

I so agree about an online presence-- a real one that is not all about selling books etc but making real contacts and friendships.

Michelle Massaro said...

And that's the hard part sometimes. It feels icky when in the back of your mind you are hoping these great new friends can help your career. But sometimes you can't help it! It's a balancing issue. You have to make sure you aren't just focused on yourself but on others- just like in all other areas of life.

Thanks for joining in the conversation ladies!

Katie Ganshert said...

Hi Michelle! Definitely a balancing issue. I think as long as we're coming from a genuine place and treat people like people, then we'll be okay.

I read your comment/question on my blog. Here's my attempt at an answer:

I've read a ton of craft books, and I've gotten professional edits, taken online workshops, and all that jazz. Most people agree that every scene needs a goal and some sort of conflict to that goal. It doesn't have to be elaborate, but without conflict or some sort of tension, the story lags. Trust me, I've learned this the hard way. My first books were filled with scenes like the one you described. People getting to know people. Which may sound great to you and me, but is less than impressive to agents/editors. So, my advice: find a way to give each scene a goal and a conflict. Maybe your guy's goal is to get to know the girl, or more concrete, maybe his goal is to find out somethign specific about the girl. Like he heard some sort of rumor and he's trying to confirm or debunk it. Or maybe his goal is asking her out. Whatever. But you get my drift. Then ask yourself what could be the conflict? A good one would be the girl. She's secretive or elusive or something like that. Just make sure there's tension. This doesn't mean it can't be fun and lighthearted. It just means there needs to be tension. W/o tension, the scene falls apart.

Just my two cents. I have a lot of posts on my blog about scene structure. Check out the posts listed under Goal, motivation, conflict. Those'll help. And if you don't have it, get Debra Dixon's book, Goal, Motivation, and conflict.

Wow - talk about a looooong comment!!

Katie Ganshert said...

I'm back. Nix that. If you want some further info on scenes, don't look under Goal, Motivation, Conflict on my blog. Click on the Story Structure topic and you'll get a few posts that delve into the structure of a scene and what it needs to have. Hope they help!!

Michelle Massaro said...

Thanks Katie, I'll check that out! I think right now the biggest conflict or obstacle is himself and his nervousness. I wonder if that counts- I'll have to go read the scene again with an eye for tension. I wonder if I'll ever be done editing! Glad for the new target to put in my crosshairs though, so thank you again!